Sugar Tax

PRESENTER: Walking this traditional sweet shop is like stepping in time. The shelves are stacked confectionery born in Victorian Britain, but talk a sugar tax is leaving the owner a sour taste. Several of Martin Peet's suppliers have been going since the nineteenth century, and he fears a tax could kill a fragile industry.
SWEET SHOP OWNER: Eighteen nineties was a big boom time making boiled sweets, when mining was taking place. Lots of people were ... started producing different flavours. Why should we pick these people and start putting taxation what was part of our heritage?
PRESENTER: But sugar tax supporters, 2016 could be the sweet spot. Scandinavian countries have had such taxes, and 2012 France and Hungary joined the list, followed Mexico in 2014, and most recently Belgium. Now India, the Philippines, and Indonesia have all said they are studying similar levies. But opponents say taxes provide no health benefits.
VICKY PRYCE, ECONOMIST: In fact, the reason obesity is not just sugar or other products that come into our drinks and food, but a lot of it is to exercise. So it is quite odd in some ways to be looking areas where actually the business impact is going to be quite significant.
PRESENTER: Britain is expected to publish its strategy child obesity later this month, with the government insisting nothing is the table.

 



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